A Grandmother’s Garden

A budding white rose in the Ghost’s garden. A sickly sweet scent that sticks to my lungs. Creamy beige statues drown amongst the dead. They watched Granny Annie grow old and grey. The shrub’s skeleton turns fingers to God, Asking Granny Annie to take their hand. Continue reading A Grandmother’s Garden

Operation Mayflower

October 2286 General Anthony Fraser, commander of the military dictatorship, New Australia, sat at his desk skimming the latest of numerous holo-reports detailing the public uprisings against his ‘tyrannical’ rule. Three warehouses had been burned to the ground, and his soldiers treated as punching bags. He slammed his fist down, cursing as the glass of water beside him fell, shattering. He dropped the report and … Continue reading Operation Mayflower

What I Learned about Shame through Asynchronous Learning

It is week one of Trimester 1 and I feel … uneasy. I stare at the welcome message from one of my instructors, drawn to a phrase, innocently penned. It instructed students that should they be unable to access live tutorials, to ‘please access them asynchronously.’ Context alone allows one to deduce the meaning of this word, and a quick google search confirms what I … Continue reading What I Learned about Shame through Asynchronous Learning

Meeting and Preserving Social Media’s ‘Digital Dead’: Interview with Philosopher Patrick Stokes

As our lives become more entwined with the internet, so too do our deaths. When we die, our ‘digital flesh’, the uncollected artefacts we users of online services amount throughout our lives, become ‘digital remains’—nebulous ‘corpses’ distributed across systems and sites. Some of these remains, such as spam folders and search histories, are analogous to fingernail clippings or the contents of a junk drawer. They … Continue reading Meeting and Preserving Social Media’s ‘Digital Dead’: Interview with Philosopher Patrick Stokes

When We Name Gold

Content Warning: This piece contains mention of rape. When we name gold ‘gold’, we violently extract a metal from its natural texture, investing into it our dreams of wealth, power, spiritual purity and so on, which have nothing whatsoever to do with the immediate reality of gold (Slavoj Žižek 2010). In high school, my favourite teacher asked us to write a poem titled ‘What Being … Continue reading When We Name Gold

everything you see when you close your eyes

Image: “Night Traffic Surface” by sagesolar is licensed under CC BY 2.0. headlights sparkle crimson white dotted lines faded red it crawls between cars stagnant but spreading traces of life left behind —haunting the bitumen there is blood but there is no body no paper-thin fur trodden on by rubber, flesh now indistinguishable from earth; no feathers dancing upright, tethered to the gravel with crusting … Continue reading everything you see when you close your eyes